From Ransome to Keats to Homer

When I was ten, I read Swallows and Amazons and in the course of that, Arthur Ransome introduced me to English poetry. One of the characters, Titty (I still wonder what sort of a name is that for a girl), was much given to recalling random lines of poetry that they had taught her at school.

From:

The boy stood on the burning deck
Whence all but he had fled;
The flame that lit the battle’s wreck
Shone round him o’er the dead.

To:

… like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes
He star’d at the Pacific—and all his men
Look’d at each other with a wild surmise—
Silent, upon a peak in Darien.

These lines spoke about adventure and unknown worlds in pulsating rhyme. I’m not surprised that they stuck in Titty’s head; they certainly stuck in mine. Ransome  – and not my literature teachers – made me read Keats; and Keats made me pick up Homer again, many years after I left school.


Searching for Homer

Homer is difficult to get into nowadays; he was difficult to get into two hundred years ago too. Keats wrote:

Oft of one wide expanse had I been told
That deep-brow’d Homer ruled as his demesne;
Yet did I never breathe its pure serene
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold:

One October night in 1816, when he was twenty-one years old, Keats had read the translation of the Odyssey by George Chapman at a friend’s house – and that very same night, he wrote the sonnet On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer. The power of his images haunts me still.

Thetis gives Achilles the weapons forged by Hephaestus, attic black-figure vase. Photo via Wikipedia [public domain]
Thetis gives Achilles the weapons forged by Hephaestus, attic black-figure vase. Photo via Wikipedia [public domain]

I always enjoyed Greek mythology and especially the story of the Trojan War, but when I read excerpts of the Iliad and the Odyssey in school, they bored me. Homer wrote nearly three thousand years ago and reading him is not easy, especially in a verse form: I gave up on the Iliad at the seemingly endless description of Achilles’s shield. Yet with Keats I could stand on a peak on Darien and see the uncharted sea through the eyes of Cortez (in point of fact, it was Vasco Núñez de Balboa but I suppose that wouldn’t have scanned); with Keats I could be Galilei discovering the moons of Jupiter. Keats had seen what I failed to: he had stood on the walls of Troy and had seen the black ships appear on the horizon, he had seen Achilles fight under the walls, he had seen Odysseus tossed in the stormy seas. Keats made me believe in Homer. I went and read Pope’s translation of the Iliad but if the Hungarian verse had been boring, Pope was contrived; and they both lacked punch.

Figuratively – and literally – speaking, I was still to come across Chapman’s Homer.

In the end, for me, a 19th century prose translation from the Gutenberg Project did it. Since then, I consider the Iliad (as opposed to the Greek myths relating to the Trojan War) as one of my favourite books; I’m still reading versions of it. Someday I’ll learn Ancient Greek, and take the poetry in the original (it seems Ransome has much to answer for).

All this, by the way, occasioned by the line of Chapman’s Homer that had – supposedly – inspired Keats to write his sonnet:

“The sea had soak’d his heart through.”

Chapman has got that one so right.

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2 thoughts on “From Ransome to Keats to Homer

  1. Arwen, that is deep reading material. Something not given to browsing! I do like that quote,”the sea had soak’d his heart through.” I even understand it. Just joking around. Congratulations on your wide knowledge of such classics.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wish I had a genuine deep knowledge of the classics, instead of merely scratching the surface! But I’m always willing to take compliments (whether merited or not!), so thank you very much! 🙂

      As for the Chapman quote, the whole passage goes:

      Then forth he came, his both knees falt’ring, both
      His strong hands hanging down, and all with froth
      His cheeks and nosthrils flowing, voice and breath
      Spent to all use, and down he sunk to death.
      The sea had soak’d his heart through; all his veins
      His toils had rack’d t’ a labouring woman’s pains.
      Dead weary was he.

      It describes the moment when Odysseus, having nearly drowned, manages to reach the shore.

      Liked by 1 person

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